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protest on tuesday. that's going to repeat calling for opponents of mr. morsi. but even today there are pro-morsi demonstrated takes place. they're going to be take place in cities outside of cairo. in some of these cities you have anti-morsi protesters as well. we've seen clashes in the early morning hours. they're going to attack the offices of the muslim brotherhood, supporters of the muslim brotherhood. things getting ugly there. the focal point of these anti-government protests remain here in ta rears square. i'm going to step aside to give you a live like look of what tahrir square looks like. most of them peaceful but we're still getting clashes and protests. right below they have set fire to an avis rental car center. you heard what sounded like a stun grenade. >> what you see here, they're fighting and police areighting back, throwing rocks and stun agree yads. >> any other fallout besides the fallout and the demonstrations, reza? >> plenty of fallouts from this, ran randi. first off we should tell you that the judges club here in egypt has called for a nationwide jud
president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in place until a new parliament is formed. so technically, he's going to be the most powerful man essentially he can do whatever he wants, without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, john, that has a lot of his opponents describing this as an undemocratic power grab. >> and do these changes affect both his creditics and opponents or just his opponents? >> reporter: well, look. right now, the political landscape favors mr. morsi and his political movement the, the muslim brotherhood, and certainly these decre
to top it will country's long-time dictator hosni mubarak. today mr. morsi's critics clashed with his supporters while police fired tear gas canisters into the crowd. "he's saying that he's our god" said this protester. "he's made a mistake." and this woman said that after marching for freedom the country's ended up with a new dictator. in alexandria, an angry crowd stormed the offices at the muslim brotherhood from which president morsi draws his support. they ransacked the building and then set it on fire. from outside his presidential palace today, mr. morsi addressed the nation. he said the new measures are designed to cut through political gridlock. "it was allah's will that i became the president" he said "and we need to go forward with the new steps, not backwards." but only 52% of egyptians voted for the president. now many of those who didn't worry that mr. morsi wants to stifle democracy and impose his own islamist vision on the country. >> mason: we're joined by holly williams in cairo. holly, given the scale of the protests, is there any sign morsi might change his mind? >
on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express what they call as legitimate and serious concern about mr. morsi's decrees that at least for the time being give him sweeping powers without any oversight for the next several months. he says these moves are an effort to move forward the democratic process and to draft a constitution. his opponents describe it as an undemocratic power grab, and now this face-off is taking shape. one of mr. morsi's advisers quitting today, the supreme court judicial council, the body that represents the top judges, held an emergency meeting today w
or making any concessions. they seem to be reshaping and refocusing their message, and mr. morsi's message now is that with these decrees, i didn't amass sweeping dictatal powers and they're still open to review by the courts except for the decisions that do with the formation of the pour lament and the drafting of the constitution. he says this is his way of bypasting the old remnants that want to derail the democratic process. he wants to save it. that message doesn't seem to win over the protestors, a few thousand of them behind me. it's 3:15 a.m., and the numbers are growing in anticipation of the 1 million man demonstration scheduled for tuesday. >> as you know, the president's office under great pressure from opposition factions and the judiciary to completely, completely reverse his decrees. are there any signs he's actually considering doing that? >> reporter: the way things stand right now, they are not. we spoke to a top adviser from mr. morsi in an exclusive interview and asked them about the possibility of concessions in mounting pressure, and here's what ahe had to say. what k
the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we heard the protests, the slogan, leave, leave, leave. we're hearing it again today. people saying they're not
and demanding that mr. morsi rescind his controversial decre decrees. >> to start with i want these decrees to be withdrawn and secondly, i would hope he starts to listen to us and the people. >> i am willing to stay until we oust him just like we did with mubarak. he's bringing it down on himself. >> reporter: factions opposed to mr. morsi continued to make moves to apply political pressure on the president. pro-democracy activist mohammed el baradi calling on morsi to rescind his decrees. it's not clear how many judges are going to heed the call for a strike because remember a lot of judges in egypt support mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood and so do a lot of egyptians. supporters of muslim brotherhood have called for demonstrations throughout the next few days, and that's why there's a lot of drama that comes with these developments. you have mr. morsi seemingly entrenched in power. the muslim brotherhood movement taking on opposing factions who are mobilizing, demanding for him to rescind his decrees. rez sesay a -- reza sayah, cair. >>> we have learned a delegation from gaza is now
and protesters. tear gas. and we're moving away. >> as the protests incentensify mr. morsi appealed for calm in a speech to hundreds of his supporter who gathered outside the presidential palace in cairo. he defended accusations of a power grab. >> translator: i didn't take a decision against anyone. i have to put myself in a clear path, a path that acheieves a clear goal. >> several hours after his speech, his critics were still out here in tahrir square, protesting throughout the night, setting the stage for what seems to be an intensifying faceoff between the president and his opponents. >> and ressa is joining us live now in tahrir square or near it. is there any indication that president morsi is hearing this sentiment and is in any way indicating that he is willing to kind of revise that new order he put into place? >> no, no indication that he's going to back down, but protesters and opposing factions don't look like they're backing down either. we know the protests and the demonstrations are happening. today what we saw is a number of moves and meeting rooms and decisions announced i
of these decrees. they seem to be reshaping and refocusing their message. mr. morsi's message now is, with these decrees, i didn't amass sweeping dictatorial powers and my decisions are still open to review by the courts, except for the decision that has to do with the formation of the parliament and the drafting of the constitution. he says this is his way of bypassing the old remnants of the mubarak regime that wanted to derail the democratic process, he wants to save it, that message doesn't seem to be winning over the protesters, a few thousand of them behind me. it's 3:15 a.m., their numbers seem to be growing in anticipation of the 1 million man demonstration scheduled for tuesday. >> they're under calls to decrease the decrees. are there any signs he's considering doing that? >> the way things stand right now, they are not we spoke to a top adviser, we asked him about the possibility of concessions in mounting pressure and here's what he had to say. what kind of concessions are you -- >> translator: it's up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- are you prepared to
. what should the united states of america do? saying this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that because morsi took his steps ours after secretary of state hillary clinton praised him for helping to broker the peace deal between hamas and israel and the administration issued the state department a tepid criticism. how tough should they get? should they say you have to pull back? what should our demands and leverage be? >> our leverage is not only substantial bayance and aid, plus an imf deal but the marshaling world public opinion is also against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but in the past it's always been the united states that's brokered these deals and there's a clear perception amongst hamas that they won on this one. unfortun
, she says the new measure that is temporary and not anti-democratic, because mr. morsi wants 52 percent of the vote in the, won 52 percent of the presidential election. >> it is the same with obama, it is everywhere, democracy means that of course there will be a specific percentage for 1 and 1 shall win, but after a the election it is over. now, all of the protesters have to wait for years for the one who is elected, the president to support him, until he proves he will succeed or not. >> but no american president has ever controlled the legislative and executive branches of government and then made himself immune to judicial oversight. >> it is that consolidation of power that makes some he jinxes not only angry, but fearful. >> dr. shdi, led protests during the revolution that yeers that toppled the long time dictator hosni mubarek. >> now, he feels betrayed. >> he swore when he was elected and he was sworn to respect the law and the constitution that he has been elected. >> both president morsi's supervisor all righters and his critics are planning more protests next week if they ag
. >> if only mr. morsi was sophisticated as we hope you from your comments make him out to be. let's remember here, eliot. he's the accidental candidate that became president who essentially is taking orders from the guardian council of the muslim brotherhood which is far more, far more anti-israel far more emphatic in its attitude toward supporting hamas. so it's very hard to say how this all plays out. let's not impute too much so sophistication to a man who is engaged in what essentially is a delicate balancing act between his bosses in the muslim brotherhood leadership on the one hand and on the on the other hand the necessity of not alienating the multilateral donors who are -- who have to provide the funding that will give the muslim brotherhood for all intents and purposes, the capacity to deliver on the economic challenges that it faces domestically. all of the brouhaha aside, the fact of the matter is that i suspect that hamas decided to try to force mr. morsi and the egyptian government to essentially come to it
demonstrators filing into tahrir square and other egyptian cities, aiming their anger at mr. morsi, seems very similar to last year, of course. last year the anger was aimed at mr. mubarak. the demonstrators managed to topple him. today, victor, very similar slogans and chants, chants of leave, leave, leave, chants of we won't leave until this government leaves. the same things, the same things we heard last year and now it looks like these demonstrators, just like 2011, are going to do a sit-in. they're putting up stents, look for this to continue for the coming hours. maybe through the weekend, victor. >> we take this a step further now, reza. the only reason that mohamed morsi was able to take power was because he was elected after the people of egypt decided they were done with centralized power with the mubarak government. why do you think he took this step? what motivated this power grab? >> reporter: well, he won't describe it as a power grab. his opponents are describing it as a power grab. but his position, the muslim brotherhood, which is his movement, their position is they want to
of move by mr. morsi. >> both morsi and his opponents are saying that his move is terror. >> we will not leave until morsi and his regime leave. >> a meeting announced for monday between president morsi and the supreme judiciary council could signal the first hint of compromise but for now neither side is backing down. in cairo, steve harrigan. >>> there's a report that long range iranian rockets are on the way to gaza. according to the sunday times, an israeli spy satellite spotted rockets and weapons being loaded. the time sides an unnamed israeli source who claims rockets which were used to hit telaviv in the latest con -- conflict. iran supplies rockets to hamas between a tunnel between egypt. >>> people are lined up in rows after a fire in a garment plant. the factory made garments for wal-mart and other western outlets. since 2006, at least 600 workers have died in factory fires in bangladesh. >>> catalonians argue that they spend more in taxs in madrid than they get back. the spanish government vows to block any referendum arguing that the country does not allow a region
cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue with our -- >> are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president. we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole we must take a step to -- forward, not to backward. >> reporter: that was one of the top advisers for mr. morsi.
and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you promised the people of egypt, when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that. because, morsi took his step hours after secretary of state clinton praised him for helping broker the deal between hamas and israel and so far, at least the administration issued, the state department, a tepid criticism. how tough should they get with them? directly say pull back, what should our demands an leverage be? >> our leverage is obviously, not only the substantial billions in aid we provide, plus, debt forgiveness and an i. -- an imf deal, but the marshalling world publish opinion is against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but it always in the past the united states that brokered the deals and there is a clear perception at least amongst hamas that they won on this one. and, un
of demonstrators, already the start of violence, and all this comes just one day after mr. morsi was praised, praised effusively by u.s. officials for his role in mediating the israel/gaza fight. back to you in new york. gregg: it just goes to show you how quickly events can turn around in that region of the world. steve heir began, we'll check back with you a bit later on. thanks very much, in cairo. patti ann: and another hotbed in that region, the hamas terror group is now accusing israel of breaking ceasefire rules two days after a truce was reached along the israel/gaza border. israeli officials say they will investigate reports that a palestinian man was killed. israel has arrested several palestinians suspected of blowing up a bus in tel aviv. we'll bring you the latest on that when we have that. gregg: those are just a few of the many stories we are following this morning. a busy day in "america's newsroom." >>> plus, a boat trip turning deadly off the coast of florida. how 23 people ended up in a fight for their lives. patti ann: and tragedy on the highway. a chain reaction crash ca
where we were before. >> brown: among the protestors in cairo were two men who ran against mr. morsi-- hamdin sabbahi from the leftist al- karamah party, and constitution party founder mohamed el- baradei, who tweeted yesterday that morsi had appointed himself "a new pharaoh." in his decree, morsi also held out the possibility of a second trial for hosni mubarek for the killings of protestors. >> suarez: to explain why morsi took these steps and the reaction that followed, i'm joined by nathan brown, an expert on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
here, and when you talk to them, they say they're determined to stay here until mr. morsi, the president, heeds their call. they're the peaceful protesters. at times this morning things have gotteningly. a number of clashes sparked by young men, teenagers, who seem to be out looking for trouble. what happens is they start throwing rocks at police officers. police officers respond by firing stun grenades. you may have heard a few of them a few seconds back, and we've had that type of daj russ cat and mouse game going on in the past few hours here in tahrir square here. >> there's been a call for pro-morsi demonstrations. we know there's the big one on tuesday. anything before that? >> reporter: even today according to a spokesperson for the muslim brotherhood there are demonstrations to show support for the president and his decrees, and it's so important to point out that the muslim brotherhood and president mohammed morsi have an incredible amount of support in this country. the muslim brotherhood is maybe the most powerful political movement, and that's why you have this
including human rights activists interpret mr. morsi's powers very differently. >> he keeps promising that this is only for the next six or seven months but there are also no guarantees that the new constitution will respect fundamental rights. >> reporter: almost two years after this country's revolution ended decades of dictatorship, egypt's young democracy hangs in the balance. >> pelley: holly williams is just above tahrir square in cairo tonight. holly, you mentioned it's been nearly two years since the revolution. what's happening with the constitution? when is it going to be written? >> well, it's being drafted by a committee. they've been working on it for several months. i spoke to one of the committee members today said they should have a final draft within days and it could be put to a referendum early next year. the problem is there have been constant complaints that too many of the committee members are hard line islamists who want a much bigger role for religion in government and, in fact, this month two dozen more liberal members of the committee quit over that issue. t
importantly he told aids he considered mr. morsi a straight shooter. your reaction? >> if in fact the new york times report is correct it shows this is simple. it shows blindness on the part of the president that he doesn't understand what motivates morsi, doesn't understand that basic ideology, it shows he does not understand the muslim brotherhood's objectives. with that kind of blindness as i think he demonstrated in other foreign policy areas it is very difficult in fact impossible to formulate effective american policy. it is a bad, bad sign for the u.s. and the middle east in the weeks and months ahead. >> just live with moresy and the muslim brotherhood no matter what they do? >>> i would like to know in all of these they have with president morsi what was it that gave morsi the view that he would have a freehand to try this particular gamut that he announced on our thanksgiving of all days to essentially side line the political opposition. it generated a lot of opposition. he may not be able to succeed on all of it do you think he sees it as a reward for brokering the truce. >> he feel
're determined to stay here until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. here's what one protester had to say. >> translator: i completely reject the constitutional decree that was announced last there's by the president because it gives president morsi is powers of a new pharaoh in egypt. actually, there was never a pharaoh like this before because ousted president hosni mubarak, with all his arrogance and dictatorial tendencies, never gave himself the power that no one can appeal his decisions. >> reporter: the opposing factions don't look like they're backing down, martin, neither does the muslim brotherhood and the president. that's why this looks to be an intensifying situation in the days ahead. >> reza, the president has said this decree is only temporary. what does he mean by that? >> reporter: well, this was his attempt to placate his opponents and his critics. he released the statement saying that these decrees are temporary only until a parliament is formed. and this all-important new constitution is drafted. he says this is an effort to keep the old recommend nantds of the mubarak
this is unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a ceasefire, which, by the way, is incredibly fragile. but this is not acceptable. and our dollars will be related to the progress of democracy which he promised the people of egypt. oot muslim brotherhood and president morsi's opponents in cairo on tuesday ahead of those planned protests. today morsi will meet with the country's top judges in the hopes of solving this crisis. nbc's ayman joins us now. instead of the leader whose letter begins with 346 but it's not mubarak we're talking about, it's morsi. what's going on today? >> reporter: well, you're right. that's what the people here in tahrir square have been telling us, that they've replaced one dictator for another and, in fact, you can't really emphasize this enough. it's all about a domino effect here in egypt. let's start with the most developing news and that is a cairo court has agreed to hear a lawsuit by 60 lawyers for that decree he issued on thursday. this is precisely the problem morsi says he is facing day in and day out. every time he tries to take a decision,
in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 yea
of the opposition faction continue to demand mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. we just spoke to one of his senior advisers a couple of hours ago. he wants dialogue with the leading opposition factions. he didn't say anything about these decrees today. there are talks scheduled with the judges. but at this hour, no talks scheduled with the opposition factions. tomorrow big protests on both sides. both the opposing factions and mr. morsi the muslim brotherhood calling for 1 million man protests. >> interesting timing, of course, as they try to negotiate some kind of a peace treaty there or at least continuing relation of talks with the peace talks reza sayah for us. >>> holiday shoppers in full force through black friday. did you go shopping, christine? >> heck no. have you read my book, soledad? don't spend money you don't have. >> 247, that's a record, 247 million? >> it is a record number but it's stretched out over four days now. now the days are thursday through sunday. let me throw in cyber monday, right, so it all comes together in huge, huge four-day frenzy of buying. >> total spending of w
, now i'm king. megyn: what role do you think it had, if any, the praise that we gave to mr. morsi in the wake of his role in brokering a truce between hamas and israel last week >> that was strategic idiotcy. hamas was on the ropes, israel was winning on points. morsi stepped in and basically rescued hamas and got the cease-fire. our president, secretary of state, ambassador rice in the u.n. all gushed praise upon morsi and elevated him to the state us of global statesman. it was a terrible mistake because he hadn't earned that, and the next day he thumbed his nose, to put it politely at our government and the west entirely and said, i'm now in charge, i'll do what i want, egypt is going to do what i say, and, by the way, the revolution is over. megyn: does it make it tougher for us to now condemn what he's doing? so far we've had jay carney say we support democracy, we believe the government in egypt should reflect the will of the people, we have concerns about what morsi has done. >> it would be nice if we supported democracy. but i don't think this administration does. let's be
for mr. morsi. remember, the muslim brotherhood created hamas in the first place. >> can i ask you one more question, regarding qatar's role in all of this. while while iran may be supplying the arms to hamas, they brought $4 million to hamas to buy that. what does that say with our policy? they are all allies of ours. >> it raises questions. the a i mere of qatar paid the first state official visit to gaza and forked over $450 million by which hamas was able to transfer the money to iran to buy missiles. the fact of the matter is qatar is playing a dangerous game with hamas. they see themselves as the great new power player for islamist politics in the middle east and the united states has got to be a little wiser than welcoming an amir to the united states when he is funding a terrorist organization that the united states condemns as a major state sponsor of terror. >> sensitive times for sure. former u.s. ambassador marc ginsberg. why are political opponents of health care making it happen? a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet
there are a lot of questions about mr. morsi and where he really stands and with whom he's really allied. president obama, he said during the campaign that he wouldn't -- he raised the question about whether egypt was still an ally. then today he said the report was that he reaffirmed our close partnership with egypt, and what news do you make of that? what are they trying to tell us with that statement? >> they may be trying to send a signal. it was only two months ago in a television interview the president was asked whether he considered egypt an ally and he suggested no. president morsi has a lot of proving to do essentially in terms of governing. the white house fully aware president morsi is a member of the muslim brotherhood. there are a lot of questions around the world whether he will play a constructive role in this. the white house used the word partnership with egypt. they are stopping short of calling him an ally perhaps because of the fact they are trying to hold a stick over him. you have got republicans on capitol hill talking in recent days about cutting off u.s. aid fro
think mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile, but this is not acceptable. this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> that was senator john mccain saying while the egyptian president's efforts in the israeli palestinian conflict are to be applauded, it's time for president obama to condemn him. early today i sat down with chris wallace for the inside scoop on his interview with the senator. >> as things heat up you had senator john mccain with you today to talk about mohammed morsi power grab. >> he's concerned. does the old saying it's not the first election, it's the second election. once people get into power, do they continue the democratic system or grab all the power. he's concerned it this could be a islamist coo. you have one who won in title election and issued decrease that give him unchecked power. now you have some of the same people, the young literal protesters
-fire between hamas and israel. >> we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire which is incredibly fragile but this is not acceptable. this is not what the united states of american and taxpayers expect. our dollars will be directly related to the progress toward democracy. >>reporter: the government today emphasized the president's powers are temporary and are designed to hold members of the previous regime accountable for corruption and crime but 19 -- not many in washington are convinced. >> we have to be a little cautious about saying we are just going to go in there and bully them into doing the right thing. that is why diplomacy is important the way we do it is important. we have to try to influence behind-the-scenes. >>reporter: the egyptians storm took a dive amid turmoil dropping ten points on the first day of trading after the announcement. >>gregg: thank you, steve, from washington, dc. new developments threatening to unravel the cease-fire between israel and hamas with israel reporting spotting an iranian ship loaded with rockets for gaza which would end t
square in central cairo. mr. morsi is make iing a politi gamble that most people here will vote for a constitution that represents his own more conservative views but in doing so he has infuriated many other egyptians. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo. >>> back here in the united states, many people up and down the west coast are keeping a close eye on a triple threat of storms. northern california is getting drenched this morning. and forecasters say even worse weather is yet to come. carter evans is in soggy sacramento. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. right now much of northern california is under a flood warning. this is the second of three major storms to hit the area. and already overnight here in sacramento, we've seen up to 2 1/2" of rainfall. this is the storm northern california has been bracing for. forecasters say this downpour has the potential for widespread damage. >> friday is going to be bad. sunday is going to be even worse. >> reporter: here is why californians are worried. it's not a single storm but a one, two, three punch. increasing th
the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israel. but the problem is, washington does not have a relationship with hamas. the u.s. sees hamas as a terrorist group, of course. i think that's where egypt could play a significant role here. look for secretary clinton to push egypt, its president, mohamed morsi, to get hamas to make some concessions to possibly hammer out a cease fire. yesterday egyptian officials were optimistic that a cease fire would come. today, it's not the case. all parties here seem to be continuing the push to hammer out some sort of truce while the
, obama found in his phone calls that mr. morsi recognized the danger of an escalating conflict. in the long run as the united states have an expanded role in what is going on over there? guest: in the end without some american intervention or leadership role, it is very difficult to envision a genuine comprehensive peace. the parties have to want it. and it is clear. part of the problem for mr. obama is that when he came to office the first time around, he did make that a central issue. he appointed senator mitchell as the first envoy. it was a priority position for him. and he did not get anywhere. in part, the in the arm it was really good for it. more importantly, the government really did not cooperate with him as he had expected. and the relationship between the prime minister and obama was not very good and has not been a very good. this is an opportunity for the israelis to rebuild it now that he has won reelection. it is no secret that the israelis preferred to see met romney become president. that was an issue. but he felt he did a lot and did not get anywhere. the eco
they are able to pull that off. in the longer term it's a real balancing act for mr. morsi. here on the streets he has a population strongly in support of the palestinians but he's got to keep the peace. to keep the peace he's going to get western investments and see this economy going. we are seeing evidence of that balancing act behind me off in the distance, a small crowd of protestors teargassed a few moments ago and we could expect larger numbers on the streets tomorrow, gregg. gregg: thanks very much. ainsley: what does the cease-fire mean? what does the end game mean in the middle east. jonathan sanzer the founder of defense for democracy and the author of hamas vs. fatah, the struggle for palestine. happy thanksgiving to you. >> thank you. happy tkpapbghappen happy thanksgiving. >> i think the israelis and hamas are both claiming victory. the israelis got what they were looking for long range rockets smuggled in see a sudan. they took out all the rockets. for hamas 4 they were able to fire rockets into the israeli heartland. i don't think they will be able to do it to the extent of this
. >> as the protests intensified, mr. morsy asked for calm. for those that gathered out of the pal lace, he defended hits decrees and defended accusations of a power grab. >> translator: i didn't take a decision against anyone or pick a side against another. i have to put myself in a clear bath, a path that achiefs a clear goal. >> it's now after midnight, and pockets of clashes continue around tahrir square, and many of the demonstrators are pitching tents, an indication the demonstrations could continue through the weekend. >>> only two days ago, secretary of state hillary clinton was praising the egyptian government for it's leadership in bringing stability and peace to the east. let's go to dan lothian. >> reporter: there is concern about too much power in the hands of one man. he played a key role in that cease fire, he developed what one official says is a relationship of trust with president obama, but as we know with every relationship, things can get complicated. >> at the white house, a sense of calm, kicking off the holiday season with the arrival of a 19 foot christmas tree. >> it is per
thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease fire which is incredibly fragile but this is not acceptable and the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress toward demaddress which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> brian: joining us is the navy commander from the office of secretary of defense under george bush. he is jd gordon. is it up to the president to get more involved to tell morsi to stop with the absolute monarch thing. >> i think the president should stand up to the muslim brotherhood and say we will not send aid dollars to egypt. morsi put himself [pwao-fr] the courts and law. it is one dick traitorship replaced by another. we need to get tough on egypt. >> steve: when the arab spring first started people were optmistic and it is not turning out the way we hoped it would. >> no, in 2010 the survey poll in egypt found that 17 percent of the egyptians were favorable to the united states and 24 percent favorable to al-qaida and 60 percent to the isla
? >> dialogue. >> reporter: they want dialogue. they want concessions. they want mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. what kind of concessions are you willing to make? . >> the decision is up to the president. not up to us. we are ready for dialogue with our -- >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of those decrees? >> decree is up to the president, accepting it -- we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not backward. >> reporter: so two big headlines coming out of egypt today, first off, president morsi not scaling back his decrees, sticking with them and the muslim brotherhood calling off their 1 million-man demonstration scheduled for tomorrow. >> we'll have a lot more on this story coming up later this hour. thanks very much, reza sayah, from cairo. >>> other news we're following, including news from afghanistan as the united states looks to wind down its troop strength in afghanistan, plans are being made for a u.s. military force to stay on there even after the 2014 handover to afghan authorities. our pentagon correspon
in a show of force, in a show of opposition, against mr. morsi. of course, all of these protests started last thursday when he announced these particular decrees. they hope with this kind of pressure, he's going to pull back. so far, suzanne, he hasn't. >> tell us about this group here. is it largely peaceful? we understand that there was a report that a protester died in tahrir square today. what do we know? >> reporter: suzanne, we did have a fatality today. we should tell you, most of these demonstrators are peaceful. they're out here chanting slogans, very much like they did in the 2011 uprising. but on the side streets leading into tahrir square, there is violence. sometimes those clashes get ugly. these are clashes mostly triggered by teenagers, 20-somethings, who throw rocks at police, police respond by firing tear gas, and today we did have a fatality, a man in his 60s, according to the health ministry, was killed when he suffocated from excessive tear gas. >> very quickly here, is there any response from the egyptian government to all of this taking place in the square? >> repor
. you will recall one of mr. morsy's ke crees said no one will disband this constitutional assembly. not even the judiciary. they believe it needs to be drafted to get it going. that's why opposition is upset. look for more conflict later today. >> thank you. >>> the other big news, in washington the white house tryinging to kick start fiscal cliff talks. just 33 days. congress breaks for the holidays in 15 days. >> treasury secretary tim geithner is going to try to get the talks moving today. he'll meet with congressional leaders on capitol hill. let's go to dan lothian live in washington for us. dan, tell us should americans be hopeful something will be done in 15 days? that's before congress goes on vacation. >> let's remind a little bit. it was a week ago when president obama met with congressional leaders before he went overseas. there was a sense of optimism that they could get something done. now it appear it is two sides are still very far apart. so that's why you see the president pushing this tax extension for middle class americans. the president believing this is not nec
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